Arrow Fat Left Icon Arrow Fat Right Icon Arrow Right Icon Cart Icon Close Circle Icon Expand Arrows Icon Facebook Icon Instagram Icon Youtube Icon Hamburger Icon Information Icon Down Arrow Icon Mail Icon Mini Cart Icon Person Icon Ruler Icon Search Icon Shirt Icon Triangle Icon Bag Icon Play Video

Sales Support Blog

Sustainability for the Average Joe

Sustainability for the Average Joe

The typical American consumer is showing interest in sustainable products, and brands are starting to offer simpler ways to minimize environmental impact

Reusable containers have become big brands: Ball jars, Baggu shopping totes and S’well water bottles, to name a few. But far fewer brands have bridged the gap between consumable products and reusable containers. At least, not since the milkman dropped off full bottles and picked up the empties.

There’s been a small but growing subset of consumers who are keenly interested in choosing sustainable products, but more average consumers are beginning to seek out items with a smaller environmental footprint. According to research from Getty Images, 92% of more than 10,000 people surveyed said they believe the way we treat our planet now will have a large impact on the future, but 48% say that convenience takes priority even with the knowledge that they should care more about the environment through their purchasing habits. 

Big brands stepping into the field helps ease these shoppers into greener habits without expecting them to do much extra work. Plus, a known brand name brings assurance that the quality they’re accustomed to remains.

Reducing Guilt, Increasing Convenience

A 2014 article published in the Journal of Business Ethics dove into the concept of how a reduction of guilt can drive consumer decision-making as it relates to sustainability. “We find that feelings of guilt and pride, activated by a single consumption episode, can regulate sustainable consumption by affecting consumers’ general perception of effectiveness,” the authors write. Their research, they concluded, could help with the development of sustainable marketing initiatives. 

“Consumers are feeling more and more guilty any time they put stuff in the landfill,” says Karen Page Winterich, marketing professor at Penn State University. But as the Getty research suggested, consumers struggle to overcome their need for convenience—despite their guilt. 

Some brands have decided to take matters into their own hands and offer reusable packaging. One notable and recent example is Loop. The online store and delivery service allows consumers to create an account and fill their baskets with grocery products—namely big brands such as Clorox, Febreze and Seventh Generation. In addition to the products’ costs, customers pay a fully refundable deposit for each reusable package, between $2 and $5 per item. The products arrive via UPS to customers’ homes in a tote bag, which they then refill with the empty containers once done and schedule a pickup. 

Heather Crawford, vice president of marketing and e-commerce at Loop parent company TerraCycle, says Loop’s customer insights team found that consumers want to choose a more eco-friendly product when shopping, but they don’t want to have to go out of their way to do it. “People feel really guilty every time they throw something single use in the trash,” she says. “They can imagine it going to a landfill, they can imagine it’s not being recycled, but they don’t know what to do—and there’s not really anything that’s actually accessible or convenient, or fits into their lifestyle that they can easily integrate into their lives.” 

Loop’s convenience is in the products being delivered directly to customers’ doors in reusable containers, which they can then send right back to be refilled when done. There are also plans to roll out a partnership with Walgreens and Kroger to carry the reusable packages on store shelves to add another layer of convenience. Such ease of use may have also helped Loop boost its numbers in recent months during the pandemic: When it looked like the needle was bending back toward single-use, disposable products in response to COVID-19 concerns, Loop reported a sales surge. (The company didn’t disclose specific figures.) 

“If you can get the convenience factor right, you can really drive higher levels of adoption,” Crawford says. 

Reducing Trial and Error

Loop provides another layer of convenience for customers: offering the brands they already trust. The trend of reusable packaging has been led in large part by start-up firms, so consumers seeking a more sustainable option are also faced with having to test these relatively unknown players. 

Winterich points to the so-called sustainability liability, a concept explored in a 2010 Journal of Marketing article. The research showed that sustainability is often correlated with gentleness attributes, which can be a liability if a product is purchased for its strength-related features. For example, consumers may be dissuaded from buying a sustainable car shampoo because they want a strong product and may perceive the sustainable version to be too weak. A brand such as Clorox has the name recognition of making reliable products; packaging it in a reusable container only sweetens the deal for a consumer. 

“I might be a very brand-loyal Tide user, but yet I start to see there are other options with less waste, so I feel torn,” Winterich says. “If Tide can actually offer me that lower-waste, reusable version, then I get the best of both worlds. I keep that brand loyalty that I’ve had for years and I’m still able to reduce my waste.” 

It’s another way that brands working with Loop aren’t asking consumers to significantly shift their behaviors. When it comes to sustainability, Crawford says Americans consider it to be a matter of individual behaviors—versus parts of Europe, for example, where consumers expect the government and corporations to step up to the plate. In fact, when Loop entered the German market, it was competing with an already robust packaging return program in the country. 

“Americans are used to voting with their wallet for things that are important to them,” Crawford says. “We’re used to paying a small price premium for sustainability initiatives. And [Americans] don’t necessarily look to legislators or big businesses yet as leaders who will solve the problem. In many cases, it’s actually individuals who are adjusting their own budgets and their own spending patterns to buy from products and platforms that they believe in.” 

Lead From a Mission, Build Community, Show Impact

Brands with reusable packaging could partner with a service such as Loop—Crawford says the company tries to make the barrier for entry as low as possible—but the key to marketing any sustainable product is to remain purpose-driven to the core. 

“[Consumers] want to spend on products and causes that they believe in,” Crawford says. “It’s incredibly important that you give them a clear understanding of what the value or mission of your product is, beyond just its regular features and benefits.” 

In this sense, smaller start-ups sometimes gain the upper hand. As Winterich explains, environmentally conscious brands often go beyond reusable or otherwise sustainable packaging by using ingredients that are eco-friendly as well. Start-ups have also helped to make reusable containers trendy, which pushes both consumers and larger brands to try it and be at the forefront. 

And the more something becomes a trend, the more it appeals to consumers who enjoy a sense of community. 

“As we see more and more brands emerging that are really driven by activism, with true purpose and cause behind them, it’s really important for people to feel as though they’re part of something,” Crawford says. “When they can see their community engaging with a product, when they see people that they follow on social media, when they hear their friends talking about it, and when a company reflects back to them how many other consumers are adopting a product or trend, it makes them feel part of something.” 

https://www.ama.org/marketing-news/sustainability-for-the-average-joe/

Continue reading

So you’re feeling overwhelmed.

So you’re feeling overwhelmed.

When your routine has been turned upside down and things are out of your control, it is never a good feeling. If you’re anything like me, that feeling of a lack of control can quickly turn into thoughts like, “I don’t know how I’m going to do this,” or even, “I don’t *want* to do this.” 

Continue reading

8 Proven Strategies for Boosting Your Brand's Sales - Webinar with Keith Allen West

8 Proven Strategies for Boosting Your Brand's Sales - Webinar with Keith Allen West

Want to sell more? Inevitably, there will be times when you feel hopeless as you pursue your sales goals. In those moments, you need powerful techniques to help you keep going. That’s exactly what you’re going to unlock in this lesson. You’re going to find out the precise steps to take when you feel like your dream will never happen.

Continue reading

6 science-backed New Year’s resolutions to boost mental health

6 science-backed New Year’s resolutions to boost mental health

Our New Year’s resolutions are typically going on a diet, joining a gym, or drinking less. But what about our mental health?

Every new year we set about making New Year’s resolutions. Usually they’re related to our physical health: going on a diet, joining a gym, or drinking less. But what about our mental health?

Mental health is central to every part of our lives: how we interact with loved ones, how productive we are at work, and how we feel when we are alone. So here are six things science says you can do to improve your mental health in 2020.

6. Stop dieting

A lot of people make strict and prohibitive New Year’s plans to slash their kilojoule intake. But there’s evidence such resolutions just don’t lead to weight loss, and instead restrictive dieting typically leads to long-term weight gain.

People with poor body image typically avoid social outings, physical intimacy, and exercise. Poor body image is also linked to depression, anxiety, and a raft of other mental health problems. Self-loathing does not make us thinner, but it does make us mentally unwell.

People often avoid fully participating in life while waiting for their ideal body. Make 2020 the year you stop doing this. People who appreciate their bodies, irrespective of their body size, tend to have better mental health, better sexual functioning (and more orgasms), and happier romantic relationships overall. If your goal is mental (or physical health), stop focusing on trying to be thin, and instead work on self-acceptance.

5. Eat broccoli

The more we learn about the relationship between the gut and the brain, the more evidence we get about the role of nutrition in mental health. People who consume more fruits and vegetables have lower levels of depression than those who eat less fruit and vegetables.

Nutritional improvements over time (a balance of vegetables, fruits, grains, and proteins) can improve your mental health and quality of life. Eating leafy greens and vegetables in the broccoli family (cabbage, cauliflower, kale) may even help slow cognitive decline.

4. Join a group

Social isolation is a better predictor of early death than either diet or exercise, and as strong a predictor as cigarette smoking. Making new social connections improves mental health, and being embedded in multiple positive social groups helps us cope with stress and is linked to reduced depression and anxiety.

If you have a dog, start going to your local dog park. If you like board or card games, why not see if there is a group of people who get together to play near you? You can find hundreds of groups to join on apps like meetup.

3. Move your body

I know exercise is an obvious one -- a part of you wants to skip over this resolution. Don’t. Exercise is one of the most effective ways of reducing depression or anxiety, improving sexual function, and maintaining cognitive function.

It doesn’t matter if you’re walking around your back yard or running a marathon -- any sort of movement is going to help you. Adhering to an exercise plan can be hard. Aim to identify exercise you find enjoyable, that gets you out socializing, and that allows you to build competence.

Exercise that does any of these things is easier to continue doing than exercise done with the goal of improving appearance.

2. Reduce screen time

So how will you make time to exercise? Reducing screen time is one answer. This doesn’t mean you have to give up your favorite show --without Arrested Development or Game of Thrones things rightly seem bleak. But excessive screen time is linked to poor sleep quality, as well as depression. Screen time should be part of a happy life, not a substitute for it.

1. Seek help if you need it

We often shroud mental health problems in a cloak of invisibility, hiding them from sight, and assuming we’re going to be able to “snap out of it” by ourselves. The truth is sometimes we need help, and the smart, strong decision is to seek it. Visit your doctor and get on a mental health plan.

Ultimately, you should pick goals that genuinely reflect who you are and what you want, and aim to break them down into concrete, specific steps (specify the “when”, “where”, and “how”). The research suggests doing this will maximize your chances of success.

Continue reading

We don't test on animals, but animals love using our products. Ask Priscilla.

We don't test on animals, but animals love using our products. Ask Priscilla.

What products are considered cosmetics?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines cosmetics as "articles intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions." Examples include skin cream, perfume, lipstick, nail polish, eye and facial makeup, shampoo and hair color. Any ingredient used in a cosmetic also falls under this definition. Products normally labeled as cosmetics are classified as drugs when a medical claim is made. For example, toothpaste is sometimes classified as a cosmetic, but toothpaste that advertises cavity protection is a drug. The same is true for deodorants advertised as antiperspirants, shampoos that make anti-dandruff claims and lotions that contain sunscreen.

Is animal testing legally required for cosmetics sold in the United States?

No. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (regulated by the Food and Drug Administration) prohibits the sale of mislabeled and "adulterated" cosmetics, but does not require that animal tests be conducted to demonstrate that the cosmetics are safe.

Where is animal testing mandatory?

The Chinese government conducts mandatory animal tests on all cosmetic products imported into the country. The government may also conduct animal tests on items pulled from store shelves. Therefore, even if a cosmetics company does not test their products or ingredients on animals, if they sell their products in China they cannot be considered cruelty-free.

Where is animal testing banned?

In 2013, a ban on animal testing for cosmetics and the marketing of cosmetics tested on animals went into effect in the European Union, paving the way for efforts to find alternatives for all of the common cosmetics tests that use animals. India, Israel, Norway and Switzerland have passed similar laws. Cosmetic companies in the United States and abroad that conduct animal tests will not be able to sell those products in any of these countries unless they change their practices. California, as well as Guatemala, New Zealand, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey and several states in Brazil have also passed laws to ban or limit cosmetic animal testing.

Can legislation help end animal testing for cosmetics?

One approach is through legislative and policy initiatives that prohibit the testing of cosmetics on animals. The Humane Cosmetics Act, if enacted, would end cosmetics testing on animals in the U.S. by prohibiting the use of animals to test cosmetics and banning the import of animal-tested cosmetics.

A longer-term approach is to develop non-animal tests that provide a broader range of human safety information—including information about cancer and birth defects—that would provide complete evaluation of new products. Until that time, an effective approach is consumer pressure; companies will get the idea if consumers show a strong preference for cruelty-free cosmetics and support an end to cosmetics animal testing.

Why do some companies still use animal testing?

When choosing to develop or use new, untested ingredients in their cosmetic products, some companies will conduct new animal tests to assess the safety of these new ingredients. This practice is both unnecessary and inaccurate, and the HSUS actively opposes the choice to unnecessarily use animals in these cruel tests.

What cosmetics tests are performed on animals?

Although they are not required by law, several tests are commonly performed that expose mice, rats, rabbits and guinea pigs to cosmetics ingredients. These can include:

  • Skin and eye irritation tests where chemicals are rubbed onto the shaved skin or dripped into the eyes of restrained rabbits without any pain relief.
  • Repeated force-feeding studies lasting weeks or months to look for signs of general illness or specific health hazards such as cancer or birth defects.
  • Widely condemned "lethal dose" tests, in which animals are forced to swallow large amounts of a test chemical to determine the dose that causes death.

At the end of a test, the animals are killed, normally by asphyxiation, neck-breaking or decapitation. Pain relief is not provided. In the United States, a large percentage of the animals used in such testing (such as laboratory-bred rats and mice) are not counted in official statistics and receive no protection under the Animal Welfare Act.

Are there other arguments against testing on animals?

Yes. Animal tests have scientific limitations, as different species respond differently when exposed to the same chemicals. Consequently, results from animal tests may not be relevant to humans, as they can under-or overestimate real-world hazards to people.

In addition, results from animal tests can be quite variable and difficult to interpret. Unreliable and ineffective animal tests mean consumer safety cannot be guaranteed. In contrast, non-animal alternatives can combine human cell-based tests and sophisticated computer models to deliver human-relevant results in hours or days, unlike some animal tests that can take months or years. Non-animal alternatives are also typically much more cost-effective than tests that use animals.

What are the alternatives to animal testing?

There are already many products on the market that are made using thousands of ingredients that have a long history of safe use. Companies can ensure safety by choosing to create products using those ingredients. Companies also have the option of using existing non-animal tests or investing in and developing alternative non-animal tests for new ingredients. There are nearly 50 non-animal tests that have been validated for use, with many more in development. These modern alternatives can offer results that are not only more relevant to people, but more efficient and cost-effective. Advanced non-animal tests represent the very latest techniques that science has to offer, replacing outdated animal tests that were developed decades ago.

What is the Be Cruelty-Free campaign doing to stop animal testing?

The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International are committed to ending animal testing forever. Through our Be Cruelty-Free campaign, we are working in the U.S. and around the globe to create a world where animals no longer have to suffer to produce lipstick and shampoo. In the United States, the Humane Cosmetics Act was introduced, which, if enacted, would prohibit animal testing for cosmetics in the U.S., as well as the import of animal-tested cosmetics. We're also reaching out to legislators and regulators in Canada, Asia and South America to achieve lasting progress for animals. By working with scientists from universities, private companies and government agencies worldwide, we are supporting efforts to develop an approach to testing that combines ultra-fast cell tests and sophisticated computer models to deliver human-relevant results in hours, unlike some animal tests that can take months or years.

Back to top

Continue reading

We are approved for the COMPASSION FOR ANIMALS

We are approved for the COMPASSION FOR ANIMALS

THE CORPORATE STANDARD OF COMPASSION FOR ANIMALS ("THE STANDARD")

This is the Standard by which we certify all of the companies that apply for Leaping Bunny certification, published in its entirety. 

CRITERIA FOR NON-ANIMAL TESTED COSMETIC AND HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

Words and phrases described in the Standard appear in bold and have a corresponding definition located in the Definitions section below.

To achieve approval for its own-label Cosmetic and/or Household Products, a Company must comply with the following criteria:

  1. The Company does not and shall not conduct, Commission, or be a party to Animal Testing of any Cosmetic and/or Household Products including, without limitation, formulations and Ingredients of such products.

  2. The Company does not and shall not purchase any Ingredient, formulation, or product from any Third Party Manufacturer or Supplier that conducted, Commissioned, or had been party to Animal Testing on said Ingredient, formulation, or product after the Company's Fixed Cut-off Date. If a formulation, Ingredient, or product is found not to comply with the Standard, the Company will replace it with an alternative that complies with the Standard's criteria or remove it from the product range.

    1. The Company must implement a Supplier Monitoring System:

      Option 1. A Company must obtain and provide to CCIC Declarations of Product Compliance and Declarations of Raw Material Compliance from each of its Third Party Manufacturers and Suppliers that said persons or entities comply with the provisions of the Standard with respect to the materials supplied to the Company. This information will be maintained on file at the Company's principal place of business as part of the Company's Supplier Monitoring System.

      Option 2. Insert the following language into the Company's (and, if applicable, Third Party Manufacturer's) Purchase Orders for Ingredients, formulations and finished products. A sample Purchase Order must be submitted to the Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC) as proof of compliance. The language must read as follows:

      "The supplier affirms by fulfilling this order that it does not conduct or commission animal testing of any cosmetics and/or household products, including without limitation, ingredients or formulations of such products, supplied to [relevant entity] after [Company's Fixed Cut-off Date]."

      Note: Companies are not required to obtain Declarations of Raw Material Compliance from suppliers of Natural Agricultural Ingredients.

    2. If the Company only distributes finished Cosmetics and/or Household Products, the Company shall require:

      (1) the Third Party Manufacturer(s) of those products to sign, and submit a copy to the Company, the Declarations of Product Compliance confirming that they did not and shall not conduct or Commission Animal Testing on said Ingredient, formulation, or product, and further, that the Third Party Manufacturer did not and shall not purchase any Ingredient, formulation, or product from Suppliers that conducted or Commissioned Animal Testing on said Ingredient, formulation, or product after the Company's Fixed Cut-off Date; and

      (2) the Third Party Manufacturer(s) of those products to obtain and maintain on file the signed Declarations of Raw Material Compliance, which certifies that their Supplier(s) and intermediary agent(s) comply with the Standard.

  3. The Company shall not allow Animal Testing to be performed by or for submission to regulatory agencies in foreign countries. The Company shall include language as an addendum to its contracts with any Distributor(s) selling the company's products for entry into foreign markets (any country other than United States and Canada). A sample contract addendum must be submitted to the CCIC as proof of compliance. The language must read as follows:

    "The Distributor affirms that it will not conduct, commission, or be a party to animal testing nor allow animal testing to be performed by or for submission to regulatory agencies in order to distribute [Company's] products in foreign markets.

  4. The Company shall submit the Application for Approval to the CCIC and retain a copy of this document at the Company's principal place of business.

  5. The Company shall agree to the following:

    1. A. Recommit annually; and
    2. B. CCIC may require a Company's Supplier Monitoring System to be submitted to an Independent Audit.

      (1) A company demonstrating less than $10 million in gross annual sales must agree to an independent audit commissioned by the CCIC with an accredited auditing firm.

      (2) A company demonstrating $10 million or more in gross annual sales shall commission an independent audit with an accredited auditing firm provided by the CCIC. 

Definitions

ANIMAL TESTING

All testing of finished Cosmetics and/or Household Products, or any one or more Ingredients or formulations used in manufacturing or production of such products in which whole non-human animals are the test subjects, including without limitation, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and non-human mammals. Animal Testing excludes in vitro tests or tests conducted completely with human volunteers.

The prohibition against Animal Testing contained in the Standard does not apply to the purchase of animal-tested Ingredients if: (a) the ingredient was tested to meet explicit statutory or regulatory requirements for animal testing; AND (b) the testing was not conducted to assess safety, efficacy, or environmental effects of Cosmetics and/or Household Products.

COALITION
The Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC) and The European Coalition to End Animal Experiments (ECEAE).
COMMISSION
Where a Company requests a Third Party Manufacturer, Ingredient Supplier, other company in the group, or contract testing laboratory to conduct Animal Testing.
COMPANY
The person, corporation, partnership, or other legal organization that has separate existence and can function legally, including without limitation, its subsidiaries, affiliates, divisions, agents, and employees, involved in selling Cosmetic and/or Household Products under its own name.
COSMETICS
Personal care products, including without limitation, products for the hair (e.g., shampoo, conditioner, coloring agents, depilatory agents), skin (e.g., soap, moisturizer, sunscreen, aftershave, antiperspirant, deodorant, talcum powder, bubble bath), mouth (e.g., toothpaste, mouthwash), nails (e.g., nail polish, polish remover), perfume, cologne, lipstick, eye shadow and liner, and rouge. Cosmetics also means personal care products marketed or regulated as over-the-counter drugs (e.g., toothpaste marketed with the claim of fighting cavities, mouthwash marketed with the claim of killing germs).
DECLARATION OF PRODUCT COMPLIANCE
Written confirmation obtained by a Company once a year from its Third Party Manufacturers and Suppliers that they have not be involved with Animal Testing for the product. The manufacturer will have gathered Declarations of Raw Material Compliance to substantiate this declaration. These documents form the Company's Supplier Monitoring System.
DECLARATION OF RAW MATERIAL COMPLIANCE
Written confirmation by a Supplier, obtained once a year, that the Supplier has not been involved with Animal Testing for specified Ingredients. These documents form the Company's Supplier Monitoring System.
DISTRIBUTOR
A distributor that manages the sale of products from a Company into foreign markets. A distributor does not include retailers that sell directly to foreign customers through their websites.
FIXED CUT-OFF DATE

A date after which a Company, its Third Party Manufacturers, and/or Suppliers must not have conducted or commissioned Animal Testing for the Company's own-label products and/or Ingredients supplied for use in the Company's Cosmetic and/or Household Products.

A Fixed Cut-off Date must be fixed, and applied across the Company's entire Cosmetic and/or Household Products range, now and in the future.

GROSS ANNUAL SALES
Financial figure applied to a Company's own-label range of Cosmetic and/or Household Products.
HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS
As used in the Standard, Household Products means those products identified as household products in the Consumer Product Safety Commission Act, including without limitation, laundry and dish detergent, bleach, cleaners and cleansers, floor wax, furniture polish, and air fresheners. Household Products does not include paint and paint remover, varnish and other stains, chemical drain declogger, or insecticide.
INDEPENDENT AUDIT
An assessment of a Company's Supplier Monitoring System.
INGREDIENT
A single substance or mixture of substances, system, or compound, intended for use in Cosmetic and/or Household Products, as listed on the product label.
LOGO LICENSEE
Company that chooses to sign the Logo Licensing Application Form and purchase and/or acquire logo licensing rights to the Leaping Bunny Logo.
NATURAL AGRICULTURAL INGREDIENTS
Raw ingredients grown from the earth and supplied in this raw, unprocessed state. (For example, grown herbs and flowers. However, the definition does not include Ingredients such as essential oils, stabilizers, preservatives or other additives that are supplied by an Ingredient manufacturer.) Natural Agricultural Ingredients are excluded from needing a Declaration of Raw Material Compliance.
STANDARD
The Corporate Standard of Compassion for Animals, which forms the criteria for CCIC approval.
SUPPLIER
Any manufacturer that supplies, directly, through an agent, or Third Party Manufacturer, any Ingredient or Ingredient mixture used in the formulation of a Company's own-label Cosmetic and/or Household Products. This includes the original manufacturer of the Ingredient.
SUPPLIER MONITORING SYSTEM
A system by which a Company monitors its Third Party Manufacturers and Suppliers at least once a year to ensure that they have not conducted or Commissioned Animal Testing. Suppliers to be monitored must include the original manufacturer of the Ingredient.
THIRD PARTY MANUFACTURER
A manufacturer that produces products on behalf of the Company seeking approval under the Standard.

Continue reading

IBE Best in Show Nominees

IBE Best in Show Nominees

2019 BEST IN SHOW NOMINEES

After another incredible year at IBE, we are thrilled to announce the 2019 Best in Show Award Categories and Nominees.

Almost 350 products have been nominated across 40 categories after exhibiting at any of our five 2019 shows: Los Angeles, Berlin, Dallas, New York and London. Also below, you will also find our esteemed panel of professional beauty experts who have been testing the products, evaluating such criteria as: functionality, efficacy, texture, durability, packaging, scent, ingredients, performance, design and social responsibility. Finalists will be announced towards the end of the year and the winners will be announced in January 2020 before IBE LA.

An exclusive limited-edition collection of winning brands will also be made available for purchase following the announcement. To get your hands on the collection first, join the waitlist for first access!

Read more about our 2019 Best In Show nomination launch on Beauty Independent.

*2018 BIS Winner / *2017 BIS Winner / *2016 BIS Winner

Little Butterfly London
o.Moi Skincare
TBH Kids
Visha Skincare
 
 
Bartpracht GmbH
Belle & Beast Organics
Scotch Porter
*Way of Will
 
 
A Wholesome Glow
Berlin Skin
Bija Essence
BLNCD Naturals
Camille Obadia Skincare
Cannibabe
Free + True Skincare
Henua Organics
I and I Botanicals
Marine + Vine
Petal Fresh® Superfoods™
Pure Mana Hawaii
 
Beboe Therapies
Dame Products
Free + True Skincare
Haruharu
Henua Organics
I and I Botanicals
Maiiro
Nala Care Inc.
*O’o Hawaii
Othús Perfumery
Rosebud Woman
solara suncare
 
*Au Naturale Cosmetics
Clare Blanc
*CLOVE + HALLOW
EcoStardust
Northlore
REALHER
UND GRETEL
 
ACE BEAUTE LLC
Aether Beauty Co
Clare Blanc
IBY Beauty
Lord & Berry
REALHER
*SAINT COSMETICS
UND GRETEL
 
Ayr Skin Care
*PLANT Apothecary
SkinKick
Switch2Pure
*TRACIE MARTYN BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Trisha Watson Organics
Viliv
Yangu Beauty
 
ANDA Skincare
Camille Obadia Skincare
Higher Education Skincare
naisture
Viliv
WHISH BEAUTY
 
 
ABSOLUTION
Acaderma Inc.
AMPERSAND
Biophile Skincare
BYROE
*Code of Harmony
Herbologia
Honor MD Skincare
InstaNatural
LaFlore Probiotic Skincare
Leaf People Skin Care
LEYOS
Nø Cosmetics
Refresh Skin Therapy
SkinKick
Teami Blends
Viliv
 
Alister for Men by Dan Bilzerian
Dead Sexy by Margot Elena
ILSA FRAGRANCES
KIERIN NYC
Marine + Vine
Othús Perfumery
Stories by Eliza Grace
The Sage Lifestyle
 
Bukli Haircare
Copperhed Hair Care System
Cria Hair
Danielle Creations
Kèrluxe
label.m USA
Pony puffin by PUFFIN BEAUTY
Smooth and Strong CBD Haircare
Virtue Labs
Zenz Organic Products
 
BOOTSY HEALTH
Cannabliss Organic
CLEBAN
ENERGYbits Inc.
*HUM Nutrition
Hush + Hush
Nutrafol
SkinTē
Stamba Inc
 
Herbal Dynamics Beauty
Inlight Beauty
KISS YOUR CRAVINGS GOODBYE
KOCOSTAR USA
LA LA LEAF
*patchology
True North Beauty
 
*CLOVE + HALLOW
L.O.V. Cosmetics
My Moi
The Organic Skin Co.
 
 
ALL TIGERS
EMILIE HEATHE
enmarie
gitti
Taupe Coat
The SIGN Tribe
 
CTRL Cosmetics
Dermatologist’s Choice Skincare
Herbal Dynamics Beauty
Little Butterfly London
POLAAR
SUB & TARCTIC
SWAY
TERRA/FORM
The Good Patch by La Mend
The Spoiled Bee Cosmetics
Viking Beauty Secrets
 
Asutra
Be You
black chicken remedies
KISKANU HUMBOLDT
LA LA LEAF
*Little Moon Essentials
Mineralgia
Simris
Sweet and Kind
Switch2Pure
Visha Skincare
 
Amazon Beauty®, Inc. | Rahua®
ATAR GOLD / PHYTO LUX
COCONUT TREE
Comprehensive Cranium Care®
EVOLVh
Flow Cosmetics
FOAMIE
*Hydro Hair
NatureLab. TOKYO
Nelson J Beverly Hills
Nuuvo Haircare
Pharmacopia Natural Bodycare
The Seaweed Bath Co.
TRUHAIR by Chelsea Scott
Virtue Labs
Zatik Naturals
Zenz Organic Products
A Wholesome Glow
Asutra
I and I Botanicals
I WANT YOU NAKED – Natural Skincare
Intoxicating Beauty
Laki Naturals
LEDIBELLE
*Little Moon Essentials
NHCO Botanical Bodycare
 
Bodhi
Bonblissity
C and The Moon
Céla
Intoxicating Beauty
JURENKA Body Care
LATHER
Organically Wonderful
Sanara
 
Bleu Lavande
Bodhi
Petal Fresh® Superfoods™
Pharmacopia Natural Bodycare
Stories by Eliza Grace
 
 
*Au Naturale Cosmetics
Cria Hair
**Province Apothecary
 
 
Beautiac
Cellu-cup / Glowcup
Croon
GLAMCOR
hess klangkonzepte – Sound Self Care
Kusshi
PMD Beauty
Spoolies® Hair Care Products
 
ANJALI MD Skincare
APRICOT INC.
Ayr Skin Care
Berrichi
BLÜH ALCHEMY
POLAAR
Popmask
*Restorsea
Seaside Medical Technologies
Veriphy Skincare
Yangu Beauty
 
BEIGIC
BEVARA SKIN
*Code of Harmony
CTRL Cosmetics
ELENI & CHRIS
Herbologia
Minimo Skin Essentials
Refresh Skin Therapy
Shaffali
The Ellen Lange Retexturizing Peel
Trisha Watson Organics
Urban Skin Rx
 
Acaderma Inc.
Codex Beauty
EXERTIER
Good Science Beauty
Graydon Skincare
LaFlore Probiotic Skincare
Leaf People Skin Care
OTACI
Sweet and Kind
*When® BEAUTY
WHISH BEAUTY
 
Asutra
Flow Cosmetics
Inlight Beauty
Iroha Nature
*Little Moon Essentials
naisture
Voesh
WHISH BEAUTY
 
 
FLAUNT Body
Living Libations
Marin Bee Pure Honey Skincare
Valloloko
 
 
APRICOT INC.
Green Stem
Merci Handy
nooii
*SPARITUAL
 
 
Hawrych MD Lash
OTACI
Pinky Goat
Starr Beauty Products
 
 
CLOVE + HALLOW
*Elvis & Elvin Inc
Gorjue
Hickey Lipstick
Lucky Chick
*SAINT COSMETICS
Spoil Me Beautiful
The Organic Skin Co.
UND GRETEL
Unicorn Snot
 
Banila Co
Be Fancy
*Code of Harmony
DUCALM Skincare
Nature Organic Beauty
**Province Apothecary
PURE AURA
Yangu Beauty
Yon-Ka Paris
 
Dirt Don’t Hurt
Georganics Ltd.
Halosmile
Living Libations
My Magic Mud
 
Be You
Blume
Bra in a Box
Kegelbell
Lunette Menstrual cups
Rael
Rosebud Woman
Saalt
The Hello Cup
 
Graydon Skincare
Kegelbell
KISKANU HUMBOLDT
Living Libations
Rosebud Woman
Smile Makers
 
 
*ELENI & CHRIS
Elvis & Elvin Inc
ESW Beauty (previously Elina Skin)
Karuna Skin LLC
Knours
LAPCOS
Limese
MĀSK
MILU
*patchology
*When® BEAUTY
 
 
Aether Beauty Co
Biophile Skincare
Coconut Matter Limited
Ethique
Georganics Ltd.
Maiiro
POGO® Lip Balm
THE MOON
The Organic Skin Co.
 
black chicken remedies
Blume
Cleo&Coco Natural Body Care
ECO BY SONYA
FIELD
Honestly pHresh
KIND-LY
milk + honey
Nala Care Inc.
SWAY
Switch2Pure
Zatik Naturals
Zion Health

Continue reading

5 Ways to Humanize Your Marketing

5 Ways to Humanize Your Marketing

After thousands of conversations with hundreds of brands, I’ve noticed something strange: Small brands are always trying to look big, while big brands are often trying to look small. I understand where each is coming from, but my advice is the same: It’s more important to make your brand seem human.

The more personal your marketing, the more likely the audience is to feel a connection to the brand, to care and to know what matters to you. Big or small, the brand that feels most human is likely to win the business.

Continue reading
  • Page 1 of 5
  • Page 1 of 5